Forums Workshop Academy Monday, October 29, 2018 (7:00-9:30pm) Basic Aluminum Chassis Design/Build

This topic contains 17 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by MiA MiA 2 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #8947
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Basic Aluminum Chassis Design/Build

    Description:

    Monday October 29, 2018 - 7:00 - 9:30pm

    Those of you who have now raced against KensRedZed have witnessed the performance of his blue 1949 Ford sedan. Machined from a single piece of aluminum square stock his chassis is a simple and efficient alternative to the brass and wire builds most of us are so familiar with. Ken himself will walk us through all of the steps to create an aluminum chassis, including samples with demonstrations regarding:

    1. Tools and materials needed to get started in basic aluminum chassis building
    2. Mapping out a chassis for a desired body, motor, and wheels
    3. Good machining practises
    4. Mounting the chassis to the body
    5. Adding weight

    Limit of 7 for this event so make sure to register early below.

    Thank you to Ken for organizing and conducting this workshop!

    Registration opens at 11-10-2018 06:30

    Registration closes at 29-10-2018 19:00

    Max Participants: 7

    Registered Users:

    1. artdart
    2. Jimbo
    3. f1nutz
    4. JMSracer
    5. KensRedZed
    6. MiA
    7. Chubbyvette

    Registration is currently closed.

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9102
    JMSracer
    JMSracer
    Member

    Just wondering, is this going to be held at Art’s or Ken’s place?

    Should we bring anything?

  • #9103
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    All are held here at The Ring unless otherwise indicated – so here…

    Usually only your questions but I’ll defer to our workshop leader and await RedZed’s response… I’m looking forward to it as much as everyone else…

    BTW, I believe you’ll see a new Aluminum chassis in a 312p at the Classic Era Challenge Cup this Saturday at MVL… this will be a true test in an unlimited class… be there or don’t be there…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9104
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    There was a blank registration which I removed – not sure how that happened… so two spots left as of now…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9114
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    I will bring hand-outs for references.

    Please bring your own safety glasses if you want to watch the drilling process. Thanks for asking.

    Ken

     

     

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9142
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Ken offered a draft of his 2 page hand out to review – it is quite comprehensive and provides part numbers and brands – an excellent compliment for what I am sure will be a very helpful demonstration – he is even bringing his drill press with compound table!

    See everyone Monday night!

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9144
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    I am so far behind in building cars for S32 that I went on a painting spree several weeks ago. Yes that’s a second 69-71 white Corvette. The first one, the body is ready to install on the chassis. The second Vette will be unlimited class down the road. All this started with a humble Lindberg 49 Ford Tudor that another member donated to me. Thanks again Art. Looks like I took the bait. Hook, line, and sinker!  :-)

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by Ken Ken.

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9145
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    Here are my choices to bring for tomorrow. I need to measure them all up for a chassis yet.

    The MGB (Mouse Goes Ballistic) will be a slow-class car.

    I look forward to having fun tomorrow.

    Ken

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9148
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Wow! That paint really pops!  :wacko:  You’ll need to do a demonstration on how you get that paint on so nicely too! Thanks again Ken – looking forward to tonight’s workshop already… :good:

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9149
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    I’ve painted 9-cars in total so far. 7 are in the picture. I am no expert by any margin and consider myself a new student.

    I would be happy to show everyone all the mistakes I can make painting just one car. I’m sure it would make everyone laugh. I was given one very good lesson by Marty from Toys2envy at Group-25 static model building club. But I still had many questions. Reading your section on “how to paint” answered my questions beyond the demonstration Marty gave me. It’s a newbies right to read all the stuff that’s posted here. It’s a bit time consuming, but definitely worth digging through.

    I found out it’s not really learning how to paint. It’s more like, learning how not to paint and how to avoid pitfalls.

    Ken

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9151
    MiA
    MiA
    Member

    Excellent seminar. Thanks for going through this with us Ken. :good:

    Lots of great machining tips regardless of what sort of chassis you are making. :yahoo:

    And some excellent painting tips too.

    Well done. Thank you.

  • #9152
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    You guys are a good bunch of friends. It is my humble honour to try and give back to the sport. Everyone has been so helpful.

    Thanks goes to the club for being a good influence.

    Ken

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9154
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Ken, your enthusiasm is second to none. Thank you for sharing your chassis build tips with us last night – your demonstration was exceptional and showed the rest of us just how you do what you do… far better than any lecture or a student hands on session full of frustration and mistakes… your tips and thoughts on chassis building were sooooo helpful too! Thank you also for providing your 2 page handout… very helpful indeed – and no need to take notes…

    Thank you for offering the generous door prizes too!

    I’m sure we can wrangle another workshop session for you in December if you have the time and inclination… boy does enthusiasm rub off!!!

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #9156
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    I don’t mind sharing that I was a bit nervous. Happy to do another workshop if everyone wants one.

    Art suggested to put the reference notes here for everyone. This slightly ammended from last night.

    Please keep in mind this is merely how I do things. Always keep safety first.

    Tools and materials I use:

    1) 8″inch drill press

    2) Compound table (Kijiji, Amazon.com or Ebay)

    3) 3/4″ aluminum square tubing (Home Depot)

    4) #14 drill bit for reamer (KBC Tools)

    5) #27 drill bit for guide (Slot-It CH-10 univeral guide)

    6) 3/16″ reamer (KBC Tools)

    7) 1/16″ pilot drill(KBC Tools)

    8) Oil as cutting fluid

    9) 1-2-3 blocks (Busy Bee Tools)

    10) 2 x pieces of aluminum bar as clamps (Home depot)

    11) 4 x Bolts and nuts for clamping

    12) Flat, fine file

    13) Band saw with 3/16″ metal blade

    14) Digitial calipers

    15) Black marker (wide)

    16) Belt sander with rotary side disk

    17) Safety glasses

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9157
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    Mapping out the chassis:

    The motor is the biggest fixed factor with an aluminum chassis because it can’t sit below the motor plate (it can only if you dare to machine it). The axle should sit parallel to the motor shaft while the motor is sitting flat in the channel or the pinion and crown won’t line up properly. You can get away with a minor offset up or down which you may choose to use depending on how low the chassis will sit off the track based on your specific tire diameter. Large motors like Boxers, Slot-It, BWNC1, and Scalextric need tall tires to work. Slim-line motors like the BWA050 or Flat-6 are generally easier to work with.

    Most aluminum channel has variations in wall thickness. Always make sure the thickest wall is the bottom to give the guide all the help it can get.

    Once you’ve selected a car and motor. Figure out your minumum required tire diameter to make sure the chassis will clear the track. Short rear tires won’t work with a tall motor without dragging the chassis across the floor. Some motors may not work with some cars because the math does’t work with the tire diameter.

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9158
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    The machining process:

    1) Make sure the chassis is cut long enough. Finding out it’s too short after the fact is never a good experience.

    2) After doing the math. Mark/paint the guide and axles areas with a black marker. Scribe cross-hairs over the black marker ink using the caliper to measure from the sides. That’s how I locate the holes.

    3) Clamp the part securely without flexing it

    4) Make sure the part is true before drilling

    5) Always use a drop of oil at every drilling step

    6) Always use a pilot drill first. This prevents the other drill bits that come after from wandering. Imperative to keeping the opposite bearing side in line with the first bearing

    7) Run the drill at about 600 rpm (slow)

    8) Drill the axle and guide holes first. Drill the body post holes after removing the scrap from the square bar

    9) Never move the table once you start the drilling process. Carefully change the tools from pilot drill, #14 drill, then the reamer before moving to the next hole

    10) Mark the chassis for scrap removal. I use a band saw with a metal blade at high speed so the teeth won’t grab and bend the aluminum by mistake. Leave a good margin for error and finish with a file. The saw cuts both sides at the same time. Make sure to hold the part securely to the cutting bed or the sides won’t match.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by Ken Ken.

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9160
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    Mounting the body:

    Once you’ve assembled your chassis parts to check for optimum wheel width etc. It’s time to figure out the best location for body posts. Every car is different. I use Evergreen styrene tubing with brass inserts (inserts from Spaenaur) and 5-minute epoxy to mate the body to the chassis. Estimate the tubing to be a bit longer than it needs to be. Install the brass inserts. Then hand drill the holes for the body posts. With the chassis together, install the posts to the chassis and set the body on the posts. If it sits right. I use a dab of epoxy to get it started. Then after the epoxy hardens. I go back and reinforce it. I usually go back and adjust the height of the posts several times before it’s perfect.

    Adding weight:

    The main reason to build everything extremely light is so that you can go back and put weight back into the car so it will handle better. Someone keeps telling me that the race is won or lost in the corners. A low CG helps keep the car on the track in the corners. You need to bring as much of the bulk weight to just above the track to try and cancel out all the weight up top (fenders, hood, trunk, roof, windows, etc…) You can always move the weight up, or add some to the top of the motor if you need more tire-bite.

    Important parts:

    Professor Motor single flange roller beargings PMTR 1176

    or

    Professor Motor single flange oil-lite bushing PMTR 1073

    Professor Motor axles PMTR 1034

    NOTE: Slot-It axles are slightly oversize and won’t fit the bearings

    If you use this method of building for bearing alignment. Professor Motor bushings will almost be as good as bearings. But at after going to this trouble. Why use bushings? Unless of course you have a drawer full of bushings…

    And that was the evening.

    KensRedZed

    I came in last. But had a blast!

  • #9184
    MiA
    MiA
    Member

    Another place to possibly look for a compound table should you be interested. Looks like you need to order them.

    https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.micro-compound-table-kt-70.1000800551.html

     

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