Forums Scratch Built Models D'Art Porsche 550 Spyder

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Art Art 3 hours, 14 minutes ago.

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  • #12581
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    I painted this car last July. The body should be safe to handle by now.

    Someone suggested I expand my build threads so others can learn how to duplicate my mistakes. Careful what you wish for.

     

    I measured the wheelbase and mapped out the chassis. Then I installed axle spacers on all 4-corners to help figure out the track width as well as center the chassis to the body when I glue in the body posts. I will remove the rear axle spacers after cutting the axles to length on final assembly. The front axle spacers remain in place to keep the independent wheels centered.

    5mm spacing per corner was just right for this combination of parts. The chassis lays down nicely in the body.

    The tires are touching the inside of the top of the fenders at this point. But avoid the sides of the fenders. The build is self-slamming.

    I used to scratch my head on how to figure out the length of the posts. Toothpicks are a handy measuring device.

    I’m looking forward to seeing this car run. This will be the lowest car I’ve ever built. If this car runs half as good as the RS61? It will be a blast to drive! :yahoo:

    Faster than a speeding bullet... more powerful than a locomotive... able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yes, these are some of Chuck Norris's warm-up exercises!
    Chuck Norris doesn't churn butter. He roundhouse kicks the cows and butter comes straight out!

  • #12582
    Avatar
    Luis Meza
    Member

    Thank You Ken for sharing your knowledge, big help for those new in the hobby (I am not mentioning names).

    It looks very nice, it might be fast, not faster than a Smart Car I have seen around the tracks though

  • #12583
    Ken
    Ken
    Member

    Once you’ve figured out the track width. There is a simple and effective way to measure how much axle to cut. Calipers are usually ground flush at the end as a third measuring device beyond the obvious ones on the front.

    Extend the rod more than the axle sticks out beyond the wheel.

    Then slide the caliper closed until the end bottoms out on the axle with the rod touching the wheel.

    There’s the exact length of how much to cut off this specific axle. I check it several times to make sure.

    Then take the axle out. Install it in a drill. Take a magic marker, spin the drill and mark the axle close to the general area where it’s going to be cut. Make sure to not to be shy with the marker.

    Then take the calipers with the measurement pre-set and locked. Touch one end of the calipers to the end of the axle and scribe a thin line through the magic marker line with the other side of the calipers. There’s your cutting line.

    The axle is ready and marked to be cut. Spin it in the drill while using a Dremel cut-off disk close to the line. The rest is basically Dremel cutting skills. Practice, practice, practice.

    Chassis’s with independent front wheels have the axle sticking out one side. Chassis’s without indepedents, and all rear axles require measuring both sides of the axle. Add the numbers to find out how much in total to cut off. No need to center the axles when doing a mock-assembly.

    Faster than a speeding bullet... more powerful than a locomotive... able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yes, these are some of Chuck Norris's warm-up exercises!
    Chuck Norris doesn't churn butter. He roundhouse kicks the cows and butter comes straight out!

  • #12584
    Avatar
    Luis Meza
    Member

    Very useful instructional pictures and guide lines

    Thank You, there is no excuse now not to be faster than Chuck Nurris

  • #12634
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Looks good so far! :good:

    Let's Get Building!

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