Viewing 10 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #17773
      KenKen
      Moderator

      This M1B prototype got moved to the front of the build line. The plan is to standardize the M1B for DArt body/KRZ chassis quick-build kits in the near future. Chassis will be designed for slim-line motors to sit flat without the use of any spacers.

      A new paint-booth is under way. I decided to undo the mess I made in the basement kitchen before it became permanent. Anyone would have a hard time to figure out dozens of cars were painted there now.

      This prototype has CX0201 tires with 13×7 wheels on the front. The next prototype will have RM0201 tires with 13×5 wheels on the front.

      Even though I may be new at this myself. How can I help you build your car?

    • #17774
      KenKen
      Moderator

      There are many ways to assemble a chassis. This way works well when using an aluminum chassis.

      The first step is to remove the original body posts.

      Axle spacers help keep wheels in line with the chassis. And the chassis in line with the body. It’s good to have a variety of sizes available.

      Install all four bearings (or bushings) with the flange on the outside of the chassis for the purpose of mounting the body posts. (The rear bearings are later removed and reinstalled on the inside of the chassis at the time of final assembly)

      Spacers are installed to take up all the end play. The tires are locked into the body. The body and chassis can’t possibly be missaligned unless the body or tires are off. Always use the largest spacers, and the least number of spacers to prevent a possible spring/spacer effect.

      Laying the chassis and body on the tech block shows that the body sits far too low. The body posts are measured, sanded down by hand, and tested several times until the preferred body height is reached.

      So now the body sits at almost the right height. It will move up 1mm from where it is once the steel and urethane washers are added.

      However, the body rocks back and forth on the posts. Precise spacers are made up from 3-cleaned, new razor blades. They straddle the rocker panels on both sides and provide a very even surface for the body to sit flat to the tech block. Now the body is as flat to the chassis, as the rocker panels can provide.

      Raising the body created end play between the tires and body. I will need to go back and add axle spacers on all 4-corners to take up the play.

      Once the axle spacers are installed and the body sits snug and flat. The body needs to be scratched up where the epoxy/body posts will sit. Mix the epoxy. Apply it to the body, then a small dab on the posts. Sit the body on the chassis making sure the wheels/tires don’t sit too far forward or back in the wheel wells.

      Install the steel and urethane washers. Then remove the extra axle spacers as needed until the tires no longer rub on the body while flexing the body float.

      The next step will be installing the motor, cutting axles to size, and installing the drive gears.

      Even though I may be new at this myself. How can I help you build your car?

    • #17775
      GI
      Member

      Very informative.  Thanks for taking the time to do a step by step post,

    • #17776
      ArtArt
      Super Moderator

      Thanks Ken for this detailed KRZ / M1B chassis setup guide! :good:

      Let's Get Building!
      From Prince - "Life is a party and parties aren't meant to last"...

    • #17814
      KenKen
      Moderator

      Gary and Art. I humbly thank you both for your kind words.

      The pressure is on for the next step!

      Even though I may be new at this myself. How can I help you build your car?

    • #17835
      Porsche911Porsche911
      Member

      Thank you KRZ for the pictorial essay and detail, greatly appreciated, and very helpful! However, as I’m about to embark on my 1st KRZ build, curious as to how you fix/glue the bushings securely into place for finished product? I know that with accurate spacer configuration, the likelihood of bushing dislodging should in theory be minimal at most, but, do you simply apply a small bead of ‘Super glue’ or Epoxy on bushing flange, then insert, or on chassis opening for bushings, both?

      What’s the secret sauce? I know you’re trying to make your assembly idiot-proof, and I don’t want to prove you wrong! LMAO.

      Thanks again.

       

    • #17836
      KenKen
      Moderator

      Hi Drew,

      There’s a small tutorial called “How to install body posts” in the KRZ chassis area. I humbly thank Art for creating that section.

      Body posts

      In short. You are correct. A good dab of epoxy in the body where the posts will sit. A small dab on both posts just before laying the body on the chassis. The body goes on the chassis so the epoxy pools to the post. Here are some examples.

      Even though I may be new at this myself. How can I help you build your car?

    • #17837
      AvatarChris Walker
      Member

      Thank you KRZ for the pictorial essay and detail, greatly appreciated, and very helpful! However, as I’m about to embark on my 1st KRZ build, curious as to how you fix/glue the bushings securely into place for finished product? I know that with accurate spacer configuration, the likelihood of bushing dislodging should in theory be minimal at most, but, do you simply apply a small bead of ‘Super glue’ or Epoxy on bushing flange, then insert, or on chassis opening for bushings, both? What’s the secret sauce? I know you’re trying to make your assembly idiot-proof, and I don’t want to prove you wrong! LMAO. Thanks again.

       

      You may want to consider using “Red” Locktite to secure bushings/bearings in you aluminum chassis…..it will hold better than CA/epoxy, and if/when you need to remove/replace your bushings a touch on the bushing/bearing with a hot soldering iron will soften the locktite, and they will be easy to remove. Locktite has been used to secure bushings/bearing for decades.

      Make sure that you install an axle and both bushings in the chassis before gluing, this will reduce the chance of them not aligning properly.

      The following is an easy/effective procedure……..

      1/Use some wheels/tires and some spacers and set the lateral axle  spacing so that there is just a 1/16 of sideplay…enough so that you can a see a small gap between the axle upright face and the bushing flange, without the bushing falling out of the hole in the upright.

      2/ Using a toothpick, apply a small amount of locktite between the flange and the face of the axle upright..(2 or 3 spots around the bushing is good.

      3/ Push the wheel so that the bushing slides into the upright, and using some lateral pressure to keep the bushing seated, roll the chassis back and forth on a flat surface for 30/40 seconds…….this will align the bushing bore to the axle.

      4/ Wait a few minutes and repeat on the other side.

      Cheers

      Chris Walker

    • #17838
      KenKen
      Moderator

      Chris. Thank you very kindly for noticing that I skipped over that question. Drew and I just got off the phone about the topic of body posts so I responded to his verbal question. Good advice.

      Even though I may be new at this myself. How can I help you build your car?

    • #17846
      Porsche911Porsche911
      Member

      Thanks all for the assistance, and Chris, excellent detail as always, greatly appreciated! Now off to find what appears to be Unobtanium in Milton…

      Red Locktite…”Permatex” appears en vogue, Home Hardware, Crappy Tire, HD… Hope it will do the trick

    • #17848
      AvatarChris Walker
      Member

      Thanks all for the assistance, and Chris, excellent detail as always, greatly appreciated! Now off to find what appears to be Unobtanium in Milton… Red Locktite…”Permatex” appears en vogue, Home Hardware, Crappy Tire, HD… Hope it will do the trick

       

      Permatex “Red” threadlocker is the same stuff……….happy to have helped.

       

      Cheers

      Chris Walker

Viewing 10 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.