Forums Resources How To – Build It Building in Upper and lower A arms and rear and front springs etc

This topic contains 11 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Bob Chapman Bob Chapman 3 months ago.

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  • #1972
    Bob Chapman
    Bob Chapman
    Member

    I jave been loo,ing at some scratch build cars in F1 classes ans see the detail  in rhe front and rear suspension systems.

    A Arms, springs or shocks, and the rear rods.or arms.

    I think,they reallly five a foos looking dinosh to,tje cqrs amd was wondering if there aere any turoeials qroumd on how to do these things .

    All in the name of scale accuracy and good lookimg detail.

    Bob :wacko:

  • #1979
    JohnnySlots
    JohnnySlots
    Member

    Some may not know, but our beloved officer Bob has injured his shoulder and is on meds. :wacko:

    So here’s the translation!  :yes:

     

    “I have been looking at some scratch build cars in F1 classes and see the detail  in the front and rear suspension systems.

    A Arms, springs or shocks, and the rear rods or rocker arms.

    I think they really give a good looking finish to the cars and was wondering if there are any tutorials around on how to do these things .

    All in the name of scale accuracy and good looking detail.”

     

    Hope you feel better soon Bob!  :yahoo:

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by JohnnySlots JohnnySlots.
  • #1981
    Bob Chapman
    Bob Chapman
    Member

    Thanks John, i didnt realize how bad it was. They changed my meds today so i should at least be a bit more understandable.

     

     

  • #1983
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Several ways to skin that cat and I’m still looking for the easiest one myself… good topic to bring up and timely from my point of view since the 804 I just raced in RWXVII is in need of some basic suspension detail still… I’ve got my eyes and ears on it…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #2048
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Found some very flexible thin gauge wire at the dollar store – pack of 200 pieces for $1.50 – you can bend this stuff by hand or using tweezers – perfect for many things, even spring coils – I’m going to try to do suspension pieces on a car with it in time for Ringwood XVIII… stay tuned… :mail:

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #5411
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Haven’t forgotten – still working on it…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #5431
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Well, it might be time to tackle this topic.

    Building Your Suspension (Part I) – Springs/Coils & Shock Absorber Assembly

    Parts needed to make a variety of sizes of 1/32 springs/coils & shock absorbers:

    • K&S 1/16″ brass tube;
    • K&S 3/32″ brass tube;
    • K&S 1/8″ brass tube;
    • K&S .032″ piano wire (to fit inside the 1/16″ brass tube);
    • .020″ (or comparable sized) soft wire (I found some very flexible steel wire at a local dollar store used for flower arrangements – strip the green plastic coating from the wire).

    Any of the above items can be substituted with another product but these are what I used. I am far from a rivet counter so as long as something looks right then in my opinion it works. If anyone is concerned with exact scale, lengths or widths then what I’ve done can be adjusted to meet those criteria. It all boils down to one’s ability and expectations.

    I will make the front springs/coils & shock absorbers for a Shadow DN1 since that is the model I’m completing – the DArt Eclektrix Quick Kit from darthobbies – a repop of the original Scaley release with some added parts. This car had some beefy but short front coils & shock absorbers.

    I wound the .020″ wire around a 3/32 brass tube to create each spring/coil for this application. For most other applications you would use the 1/16 brass tube (or piano wire). How you wind it is up to you – I wound mine tightly and then just pulled it apart slightly. When working with small bits like this don’t forget to leave a liberal amount of excess for handling which will be cut or removed later – a little wasteful but it makes the task much easier (For each spring I used about 12 cm of wire which I could wind around my finger to coil it tightly – you could wind a long strand and then cut each one off if you are on a roll to save material… your choice). This is a great task to do while watching TV…

    After making sure I was happy with the look of both springs/coils I cut the excess off using my dremel cutting disk. Using the same tool I then ground down both ends to make the spring/coil flatter so that each spring could sit upright on a flat surface (on both ends). Since the spring/coil will not be soldered or glued to anything we are done with them for now.

    (stay tuned for more…)

     

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #5432
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Basically I cut the brass tube into appropriate pieces and built up each component by simply fitting one inside the other. To cut this stuff cleanly you could use the lathe but I just used my drill and dremel to show that it can be done by hand that way for those who don’t have a lathe. If you place a scrap piece of rod or wire inside each tube (in the drill) before cutting it makes the job much easier – especially to cut very narrow pieces like the rings that will hold the coil in place. Make sure to clean up each piece after it is cut with some fine sandpaper (wet or dry).

    As you can see in the picture below each shock/coil assembly has four parts: upper & lower shock, shock arm & coil (these are not the terms a mechanic would use since I don’t know what they are called but you should get the picture). The arm has a small piece of 1/16″ brass tube soldered to it. All of the parts pictured below were soldered together – for some I used a jig since they are just too small to do without.

    In total each shock/coil piece is comprised of 9 separate parts and are now ready for paint. These parts do not need to be soldered when assembling. Each shock/coil when complete can be mounted at the top by a rod through the 1/16″ piece of tube we soldered to the top of the arm, and at the bottom by fitting the bottom of the arm inside a small 1/16″ piece of tube (or wire circle). On to paint…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #6522
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    …its been a while since Part I but the weather outside rendered most of the weekend perfect for a Part II…

    Building Your Suspension (Part II) – The Rest (Front & Back)

    Let me qualify this by stating that I am in no way an engineer nor rivet counter – my focus is on the overall look without impacting performance and because we use bulky axles often housed in an even bulkier tube/spacers there is only so much that can be done – but that doesn’t mean that it should not be done or that it still can’t enhance the overall look of the model – otherwise there is no point. Because my own ultimate test is how the model looks going around the track suspension detail is not something that I regard as necessary (since I at least can’t see these details when it is moving so quickly). Nor is this something that is for everyone to attempt. But it does make the model look better when in the paddock. And all of that suspension detail although fabricated using a very flexible .020″ dollar store wire when soldered in place proves durable too.

    Some of you may recognize this particular chassis/shell from SS32/R32 races of the past – it was one of my first soldered chassis using BWA front and rear brackets and the very first DArt body kit that I manufactured and completed. It is the model that quite some time ago we travelled on board with to complete a lap at The Ring on the darthobbies.com website.

    This Honda RA 273 had the old clear coat stripped and replaced with two fresh coats of ‘Future’ (Pledge) acrylic floor shine applied by brush. Since it was already apart and the chassis had also been stripped and cleaned I figured this was a good specimen to upgrade.

    What I Used

    For this part I would use both solder and clear 5 minute epoxy (see the scratch32 topic 9 essential adhesives for details) to fix everything in place.

    For all of the suspension pieces I used the very flexible dollar store wire (.020″) mentioned above – you get 200 pieces for a buck – but you need to remove the green plastic coating which I did by running an exacto blade (hold it nearly flat to the wire) the length of the wire then peel off the green vinyl which is easy to do.

    For the two front uprights I used some very thin brushed aluminium sheet which could be cut to shape using just scissors.

    And for the front brake lines as well as the coils I used a very narrow gauge decorative wire with a black finish.

    The Shock Absorbers

    The shock absorbers I made at the beginning of this thread were slightly too large for this application and will instead be used for my 70GP Shadow DN1 – so I made two narrower but taller shock absorbers for the rear end using the same basic technique. These shock absorbers were simpler – and used just 3 parts (upper, lower & coil) which would later be fixed to a wire soldered in place during the rear suspension build. I had some very narrow gauge decorative wire already finished in black which was perfect to make the coil. The upper & lower shock pieces each consisted of two parts – one narrow brass tube cut about 3mm in length onto which a larger diameter tube just 1mm in length was fixed. I painted both of these pieces red and while that paint dried I tacked the suspension.

    The Suspension

    The trick is to use longer pieces of wire and to solder them to the chassis first. Most will be bent after they are soldered, but you need to make sure you can make crisp bends. It is also much easier to trim or grind away the excess after it is soldered in place. I won’t specifically describe each wire and how it was shaped since the pictures do that. It helps to use graph paper underneath your chassis to line up your suspension wires. Solder a single wire for both the left and right sides at the same time – you can always trim away the centre later.

    The front suspension was fairly simple and done first. Since I planned to glue the aluminium upper arms to a support wire well above the front axle tube I needed to incorporate such on both sides. The rear suspension had two considerations to sort out – how to fix the shock absorbers and how to fix the lengthy upper suspension arms to the body. Both left and right upper suspension arms were bent out of one piece of wire that was nearly rectangular in shape, soldered into place on the rear motor bracket and then cut both at the joints with the rear motor bracket and finally just after the bend at each side towards the front. I left those cuts till the end to avoid mangling either arm. Those forward arms would simply slip into two holes drilled on either side of the body. Since they line up with the bottom arms measuring was simple.

    To mount each rear shock absorber I took a straight piece of wire and soldered it to a corner of the lower rear ‘A’ arm and then trimmed it at the top flush with the motor bracket without fixing it to anything. The shock absorber pieces (lower, coil & upper) could later be added by sliding them onto the wire after everything was cleaned and polished.

    I carefully painted the exposed tubing and rear bracket sides flat black.

    Time to add the shock absorber. I applied a tiny amount of clear epoxy to the wire ‘post’ near the bottom and slid the lower shock piece into place, followed by the coil. I applied a tiny amount of clear epoxy to the wire ‘post’ near the top and slid the upper shock piece into place making sure it fit snuggly into the coil. I adjusted the wire ‘post’ (now shock absorber) to make sure it leaned close to the top of the motor bracket and then bent another small piece of wire in a ‘U’ shape to cap the shock and fix it to the top of the motor bracket. A small amount of clear epoxy dabbed to the top of the shock absorber wire ‘post’ and the motor mount would fix this ‘cap’ permanently.

    Front upper arms fashioned from the aluminium sheet were glued in place using clear epoxy. So were the front brake lines.

    Now time for final assembly…

     

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #6524
    Art
    Art
    Moderator

    Putting it all back together…

    This model was put back together using the original Vanski motor and adhering to the 1.5L class rules although the body is no longer eligible for that class – it can still race in the 3L era and perhaps pick up a few scraps in any race despite the low power motor. We’ll see…

    ...just lay it on the line...

  • #6525

    Ken
    Member

    Absolutely incredible!

    Cheers, Ken

  • #6546
    Bob Chapman
    Bob Chapman
    Member

    Fantastic stuff Art, just the way it should be.

    Bob

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